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Can fedora16 desktop be treated as a server [closed]

asked 2012-02-15 05:02:45 -0500

Shashi2202 gravatar image

I am learning RHEL and want to practice Linux server commands at home. I am going to install Fedora 16 Desktop @home. Can this be treated as a server edition?

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Closed for the following reason duplicate question by hhlp
close date 2012-12-05 07:29:38.477624

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dupe -> #1373

hhlp gravatar imagehhlp ( 2012-12-05 07:29:30 -0500 )edit

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answered 2012-02-15 11:42:58 -0500

asto gravatar image

If you're just looking to learn, Fedora is close enough. But if you want to run a production server (without having to pay for RedHat), use CentOS.

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answered 2012-02-16 05:06:10 -0500

robotmaxtron gravatar image

It honestly just depends on what kinds of server you're running. If you're just practicing living in the shell or just learning RHEL and Linux in general Fedora will generally work quite well but as others have mentioned both CentOS and Scientific Linux are other good substitutes.

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answered 2012-02-15 06:01:19 -0500

FranciscoD_ gravatar image

Most packages available in rhel will be present in the fedora repositories. You can certainly use fedora for practice. However, if you want to run an actual, complete server for service, please use centos as suggested.

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answered 2012-02-15 06:03:09 -0500

kumarpraveen gravatar image

It's depend upon what services you want, you can install required packages using yum. but EOL for fedora is sort (around 13 months) but I don't think you face any issue if you want to use it for learning purpose but CentOS is cloned for server purpose and EOL around 5 years.

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answered 2012-12-05 05:45:04 -0500

haziz gravatar image

You can use Fedora, but like others I think either Centos or Scientific Linux, or of course RHEL if you don't mind the cost or can get it via an educational license (approx $60), are probably better choices.

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answered 2012-02-15 05:28:47 -0500

The IceMan Blog gravatar image

updated 2012-02-15 05:30:07 -0500

No really , you can use CentOS as RHEL clone

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Asked: 2012-02-15 05:02:45 -0500

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Last updated: Dec 05 '12