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Good question! First of all, the repositories that are used by both softwares (dnf and gnome-software) are the same.

Differences: Gnome Software (GUI) uses PackageKit (backend), which does not share the same metadata-database. That causes problems, especially when installing software because one doesn't know what the other did. It can leave your system in an inconsistent state. That is why I would recommend not to use Gnome-Software at all - I even disabled/masked the PackageKit service, despite reports that an online update using dnf may brick your system. The "offline" updater that they recommend is the PackageKit-based Restart & Install Updates that you will see in Gnome. (I reduce the risk of a interupting a dnf transaction (by crashing X, or gnome-terminal or such) by running it in a Virtual Terminal (CTRL+ALT+F3).

The reason why your dnf saw 700 MB of updates, while Gnome Software didn't, was probably because dnf had refreshed metadata from the server and GnomeSoftware/ PackageKit hadn't yet. You can force PackagKit to update by running pkcon force refresh.

Good question! First of all, the repositories that are used by both softwares (dnf and gnome-software) are the same.

Differences: Gnome Software (GUI) uses PackageKit (backend), which does not share the same metadata-database. That causes problems, especially when installing software because one doesn't know what the other did. It can leave your system in an inconsistent state. That is why I would recommend not to use Gnome-Software at all - I even disabled/masked the PackageKit service, despite reports that an online update using dnf dnf may brick your system. The "offline" updater that they recommend is the PackageKit-based Restart & Install Updates that you will see in Gnome. (I reduce the risk of a interupting a dnf transaction (by crashing X, or gnome-terminal or such) by running it in a Virtual Terminal (CTRL+ALT+F3).

The likely reason why your dnf saw 700 MB of updates, while Gnome Software didn't, was probably because dnf had refreshed metadata from the server and GnomeSoftware/ PackageKit hadn't yet. You can force PackagKit to update by running pkcon force refreshrefresh force.. After that GnomeSoftware should "see" the updates as well.

Good question! First of all, the repositories that are used by both softwares (dnf and gnome-software) are the same.. (Repository files are located in /etc/yum.repos.d/)

Differences: Gnome Software (GUI) uses PackageKit (backend), which does not share the same metadata-database. That causes problems, especially when installing software because one doesn't know what the other did. It can leave your system in an inconsistent state. That is why I would recommend not to use Gnome-Software at all - I even disabled/masked the PackageKit service, despite reports that an online update using dnf may brick your system. The "offline" updater that they recommend is the PackageKit-based Restart & Install Updates that you will see in Gnome. (I reduce the risk of a interupting a dnf transaction (by crashing X, or gnome-terminal or such) by running it in a Virtual Terminal (CTRL+ALT+F3).

The likely reason why your dnf saw 700 MB of updates, while Gnome Software didn't, was probably because dnf had refreshed metadata from the server and GnomeSoftware/ PackageKit hadn't yet. You can force PackagKit to update by running pkcon refresh force. After that GnomeSoftware should "see" the updates as well.

Good question! First of all, the repositories that are used by both softwares (dnf and gnome-software) are the same. (Repository files are located in /etc/yum.repos.d/)

Differences: Gnome Software (GUI) uses PackageKit (backend), which does not share the same metadata-database. That causes problems, especially when installing software because one doesn't know what the other did. It can leave your system in an inconsistent state. That is why I would recommend not to use Gnome-Software at all - I even disabled/masked the PackageKit service, despite reports that an online update using dnf may brick your system. The "offline" updater that they recommend is the PackageKit-based Restart & Install Updates that you will see in Gnome. (I reduce the risk of a interupting a dnf transaction (by crashing X, or gnome-terminal or such) by running it in a Virtual Terminal (CTRL+ALT+F3).

The likely reason why your dnf saw 700 MB of updates, while Gnome Software didn't, was probably because dnf had refreshed metadata from the server and GnomeSoftware/ PackageKit hadn't yet. You can force PackagKit to update by running pkcon refresh force. After that GnomeSoftware should "see" the updates as well.

Good question! First of all, the repositories that are used by both softwares (dnf and gnome-software) are the same. (Repository files are located in /etc/yum.repos.d/)

Differences: Gnome Software (GUI) uses PackageKit (backend), which does not share the same metadata-database. That causes problems, especially when installing software because one doesn't know what the other did. It can leave your system in an inconsistent state. That is why I would recommend not to use Gnome-Software at all - I even disabled/masked the PackageKit service, despite reports that an online update using dnf may brick your system. The "offline" updater that they recommend is the PackageKit-based Restart & Install Updates that you will see in Gnome. (I reduce the risk of a interupting a dnf transaction (by crashing X, or gnome-terminal or such) by running it in a Virtual Terminal (CTRL+ALT+F3).

The likely reason why your dnf saw 700 MB of updates, while Gnome Software didn't, was probably because dnf had refreshed metadata from the server and GnomeSoftware/ PackageKit hadn't yet. You can force PackagKit to update by running pkcon refresh force. After that GnomeSoftware should "see" the updates as well.