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You could have pasted it here: http://fpaste.org/ (There is also fpaste for your command line, see man fpaste)

As for your update process: What architecture are you on? i686 or x86-64? Please post the output of uname -a

In the meantime, you can try a sudo dnf clean all (cleans packages, cache, ...), followed by another sudo dnf upgrade

And, are you sure your repositories are setup correctly (for the right CPU architecture) ? Check it dnf repolist

You could have pasted it here: http://fpaste.org/ (There is also fpaste for your command line, see man fpaste)

As for your update process: What EDIT: To me, this looks like you have a multilib system: x86_64 with some i686 packages installed. Often, such packages share files, which isn't a problem as long as they are identical. Here, it seems like you got one architecture are you on? i686 or x86-64? Please post updated but not the output of uname -aother, and the shared lib files changed.

In The easiest way out of this is, as you already mentioned, to remove the meantime, you can try a sudo dnf clean all (cleans packages, cache, ...), followed by another sudo dnf upgradei686 packages.

And, are you sure your repositories are setup correctly (for the right CPU architecture) ? Check it dnf repolist

You could have pasted it here: http://fpaste.org/ (There is also fpaste for your command line, see man fpaste)

EDIT: To me, this looks like you have a multilib system: x86_64 with some i686 packages installed. Often, such packages share files, which isn't a problem as long as they are identical. Here, it seems like you got one architecture updated but not the other, and the shared lib files changed.

The easiest way out of this is, as you already mentioned, to remove the i686 packages.

rpm -qa |grep i686 will list you all i686 packages installed on your system. You can also try to run dnf with the option --allowerasing, which allows erasing of installed packages to resolve dependencies. (Not sure if it will work in this case.)

You could have pasted it here: http://fpaste.org/ (There is also fpaste for your command line, see man fpaste)

EDIT: To me, this looks like you have a multilib system: x86_64 with some i686 packages installed. Often, such packages share files, which isn't a problem as long as they are identical. Here, it seems like you got one architecture updated but not the other, and the shared lib files changed.

The easiest way out of this is, as you already mentioned, to remove the i686 packages.

rpm -qa |grep i686 or dnf list installed |grep i686 will list you all i686 packages installed on your system. You can also try to run dnf with the option --allowerasing, which allows erasing of installed packages to resolve dependencies. (Not sure if it will work in this case.)

You could have pasted it here: http://fpaste.org/ (There is also fpaste for your command line, see man fpaste)

EDIT: To me, this looks like you have a multilib system: x86_64 with some i686 packages installed. Often, such packages share files, which isn't a problem as long as they are identical. Here, it seems like you got one architecture updated but not the other, and the shared lib files changed.

The easiest way out of this is, as you already mentioned, to remove the i686 packages.

rpm -qa |grep i686 or dnf list installed |grep i686 will list you all i686 packages installed on your system. You can also try to run dnf with the option --allowerasing, which allows erasing of installed packages to resolve dependencies. (Not sure if it will work in this case.)

If you want to get rid of all i686 packages, you can run something like dnf remove \*.i686 but be careful not remove anything you may still need.