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So, Logical Volume Manager is used to carve logical volumes from your block devices. It is in these logical volumes that you install your file systems. So, if you have a logical volume hosting an EXT4 file system which is mounted to /home and you would like to extend it, you first must first ensure the logical volume hosting the file system has enough space in it for the file system to be extended. It is likely that the logical volume you are currently using to host the file system mounted to /home is entirely consumed by the file system it hosts, so you first must extend the logical volume. Then, you may extend the file system. This is all actually quite easy, so check this out:

  1. Check on your current volume groups using sudo vgs. If you have a default Fedora installation, you'll see a single volume group called fedora_hostname (where "hostname" is the hostname of your system). You should see in that volume group a "VFree" value of 77g, meaning that the default volume group has access to all the free space you're expecting to use.
  2. If that checks out just fine, you need to extend the logical volume you have mounted to your home directory. By default, this should be your /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home volume. Inspect it using sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home and ensure it appears as you expect (i.e. the LV size is identical to your /home directory's size). Use lsblk to confirm that your fedora_hostname-home volume is mounted to /home.
    1. If all that checks out fine, then you've confirmed that your volume group has the space you need and you've identified the logical volume you need to extend. Make sure you've got this stuff right - reducing the size of logical volumes is a more painful process, so feel free to post the output of your commands for verification that you're doing this right. Once you're sure, you now need only execute sudo lvextend -L +50GB fedora_hostname/home to extend your logical volume.

Now, I recommend the 50 GB value rather than the 77 GB value in your case because you should try to avoid consuming all the space available on your disk if you can; leaving 27 GB for future needs or emergencies is a good idea. You can always use them to extend your home volume later if you really need to do so.

  1. Now, you've extended your logical volume. You should be able to see with sudo vgs that your volume group has 50 GB less free space than it used to have, and you should be able to see with sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home that your logical volume now has 50 GB more space. All that's left is to resize your file system to consume all of the available space in the logical volume, and if you're using EXT4, that's done with the simple command: sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home.

You should see output indicating that the resizing operation completed, and if you use lsblk again, you should see that your /home directory now has the amount of space you expect.

Let me know if you have any difficulties, and if you're concerned that you're misreading anything or doing something improperly, just post your output back up here in a comment to the answer and we'll get it worked out.

So, Logical Volume Manager is used to carve logical volumes from your block devices. devices (your hard disk, in this case). It is in these logical volumes that you install your file systems. So, if you have a logical volume hosting an EXT4 file system which is mounted to /home and you would like to extend it, you first must first ensure the logical volume hosting the file system has enough space in it for the file system to be extended. It is likely that the logical volume you are currently using to host the file system mounted to /home is entirely consumed by the file system it hosts, so you first must extend the logical volume. Then, you may extend the file system. This is all actually quite easy, so check this out:

  1. Check on your current volume groups using sudo vgs. If you have a default Fedora installation, you'll see a single volume group called fedora_hostname (where "hostname" is the hostname of your system). You should see in that volume group a "VFree" value of 77g, meaning that the default volume group has access to all the free space you're expecting to use.
  2. If that checks out just fine, you need to extend the logical volume you have mounted to your home directory. By default, this should be your /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home volume. Inspect it using sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home and ensure it appears as you expect (i.e. the LV size is identical to your /home directory's size). Use lsblk to confirm that your fedora_hostname-home volume is mounted to /home.
    1. If all that checks out fine, then you've confirmed that your volume group has the space you need and you've identified the logical volume you need to extend. Make sure you've got this stuff right - reducing the size of logical volumes is a more painful process, so feel free to post the output of your commands for verification that you're doing this right. Once you're sure, you now need only execute sudo lvextend -L +50GB fedora_hostname/home to extend your logical volume.

Now, I recommend the 50 GB value rather than the 77 GB value in your case because you should try to avoid consuming all the space available on your disk if you can; leaving 27 GB for future needs or emergencies is a good idea. You can always use them to extend your home volume later if you really need to do so.

  1. Now, you've extended your logical volume. You should be able to see with sudo vgs that your volume group has 50 GB less free space than it used to have, and you should be able to see with sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home that your logical volume now has 50 GB more space. All that's left is to resize your file system to consume all of the available space in the logical volume, and if you're using EXT4, that's done with the simple command: sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home.

You should see output indicating that the resizing operation completed, and if you use lsblk again, you should see that your /home directory now has the amount of space you expect.

Let me know if you have any difficulties, and if you're concerned that you're misreading anything or doing something improperly, just post your output back up here in a comment to the answer and we'll get it worked out.

Logical Volume Manager is used to carve logical volumes from your block devices (your hard disk, in this case). It is in these logical volumes that you install your file systems. So, if you have a logical volume hosting an EXT4 file system which is mounted to /home and you would like to extend it, you first must first ensure the logical volume hosting the file system has enough space in it for the file system to be extended. It is likely that the logical volume you are currently using to host the file system mounted to /home is entirely consumed by the file system it hosts, so you first must extend the logical volume. Then, you may extend the file system. This is all actually quite easy, so check this out:

  1. Check on your current volume groups using sudo vgs. If you have a default Fedora installation, you'll see a single volume group called fedora_hostname (where "hostname" is the hostname of your system). You should see in that volume group a "VFree" value of 77g, meaning that the default volume group has access to all the free space you're expecting to use.
  2. If that checks out just fine, you need to extend the logical volume you have mounted to your home directory. By default, this should be your /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home volume. Inspect it using sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home and ensure it appears as you expect (i.e. the LV size is identical to your /home directory's size). Use lsblk to confirm that your fedora_hostname-home volume is mounted to /home.
      /home.
    1. If all that checks out fine, then you've confirmed that your volume group has the space you need and you've identified the logical volume you need to extend. Make sure you've got this stuff right - reducing the size of logical volumes is a more painful process, so feel free to post the output of your commands for verification that you're doing this right. Once you're sure, you now need only execute sudo lvextend -L +50GB fedora_hostname/home to extend your logical volume.

Now, volume. I recommend the 50 GB value (or maybe 60 GB) rather than the 77 GB value in your case because you should try to avoid consuming all the space available on your disk if you can; leaving 27 GB for future needs or emergencies is a good idea. You can always use them to extend your home volume later if you really need to do so.

  1. Now, you've extended your logical volume. You should be able to see with sudo vgs that your volume group has 50 GB less free space than it used to have, and you should be able to see with sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home that your logical volume now has 50 GB more space. All that's left is to resize your file system to consume all of the available space in the logical volume, and if you're using EXT4, that's done with the simple command: sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home.

You should see output indicating that the resizing operation completed, and if you use lsblk again, you should see that your /home directory now has the amount of space you expect.

Let me know if you have any difficulties, and if you're concerned that you're misreading anything or doing something improperly, just post your output back up here in a comment to the answer and we'll get it worked out.

Logical Volume Manager is used to carve logical volumes from your block devices (your hard disk, in this case). It is in these logical volumes that you install your file systems. So, if you have a logical volume hosting an EXT4 file system which is mounted to /home and you would like to extend it, you first must first ensure the logical volume hosting the file system has enough space in it for the file system to be extended. It is likely that the logical volume you are currently using to host the file system mounted to /home is entirely consumed by the file system it hosts, so you first must extend the logical volume. Then, you may extend the file system. This is all actually quite easy, so check this out:

  1. Check on your current volume groups using sudo vgs. If you have a default Fedora installation, you'll see a single volume group called fedora_hostname (where "hostname" is the hostname of your system). You should see in that volume group a "VFree" value of 77g, meaning that the default volume group has access to all the free space you're expecting to use.
  2. If that checks out just fine, you need to extend the logical volume you have mounted to your home directory. By default, this should be your /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home volume. Inspect it using sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home and ensure it appears as you expect (i.e. the LV size is identical to your /home directory's size). Use lsblk lsblk to confirm that your fedora_hostname-home volume is mounted to /home.
  3. If all that checks out fine, then you've confirmed that your volume group has the space you need and you've identified the logical volume you need to extend. Make sure you've got this stuff right - reducing the size of logical volumes is a more painful process, so feel free to post the output of your commands for verification that you're doing this right. Once you're sure, you now need only execute sudo lvextend -L +50GB fedora_hostname/home to extend your logical volume. I recommend the 50 GB value (or maybe 60 GB) rather than the 77 GB value in your case because you should try to avoid consuming all the space available on your disk if you can; leaving 27 GB for future needs or emergencies is a good idea. You can always use them to extend your home volume later if you really need to do so.
  4. Now, you've extended your logical volume. You should be able to see with sudo vgs that your volume group has 50 GB less free space than it used to have, and you should be able to see with sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home that your logical volume now has 50 GB more space. All that's left is to resize your file system to consume all of the available space in the logical volume, and if you're using EXT4, that's done with the simple command: sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home.

You should see output indicating that the resizing operation completed, and if you use lsblk again, you should see that your /home directory now has the amount of space you expect.

Let me know if you have any difficulties, and if you're concerned that you're misreading anything or doing something improperly, just post your output back up here in a comment to the answer and we'll get it worked out.

Logical Volume Manager is used to carve logical volumes from your block devices (your hard disk, in this case). It is in these logical volumes that you install your file systems. So, if you have a logical volume hosting an EXT4 file system which is mounted to /home and you would like to extend it, you first must first ensure the logical volume hosting the file system has enough space in it for the file system to be extended. It is likely that the logical volume you are currently using to host the file system mounted to /home is entirely consumed by the file system it hosts, so you first must will probably need to extend the logical volume. Then, you may extend the file system. This is all actually quite easy, so check this out:

  1. Check on your current volume groups using sudo vgs. If you have a default Fedora installation, you'll see a single volume group called fedora_hostname (where "hostname" is the hostname of your system). You should see in that volume group a "VFree" value of 77g, meaning that the default volume group has access to all the free space you're expecting to use.
  2. If that checks out just fine, you need to extend the logical volume you have mounted to your home directory. By default, this should be your /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home volume. Inspect it using sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home and ensure it appears as you expect (i.e. the LV size is identical to your /home directory's size). Use lsblk to confirm that your fedora_hostname-home volume is mounted to /home.
  3. If all that checks out fine, then you've confirmed that your volume group has the space you need and you've identified the logical volume you need to extend. Make sure you've got this stuff right - reducing the size of logical volumes is a more painful process, so feel free to post the output of your commands for verification that you're doing this right. Once you're sure, you now need only execute sudo lvextend -L +50GB fedora_hostname/home to extend your logical volume. I recommend the 50 GB value (or maybe 60 GB) rather than the 77 GB value in your case because you should try to avoid consuming all the space available on your disk if you can; leaving 27 GB for future needs or emergencies is a good idea. You can always use them to extend your home volume later if you really need to do so.
  4. Now, you've extended your logical volume. You should be able to see with sudo vgs that your volume group has 50 GB less free space than it used to have, and you should be able to see with sudo lvdisplay fedora_hostname/home that your logical volume now has 50 GB more space. All that's left is to resize your file system to consume all of the available space in the logical volume, and if you're using EXT4, that's done with the simple command: sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_hostname-home.

You should see output indicating that the resizing operation completed, and if you use lsblk again, you should see that your /home directory now has the amount of space you expect.

Let me know if you have any difficulties, and if you're concerned that you're misreading anything or doing something improperly, just post your output back up here in a comment to the answer and we'll get it worked out.