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Correct, you can cut the keys from the .ovpn file and paste them into separate files, and then reference them in your connection settings.

Copy the OpenVPN Static key V1 that is framed with tls-auth and /tls-auth to a new file with the ending .key into ~/.cert/ (i.e. my-ta-key.key).

~/.cert is a hidden directory in your home-dir where vpn keys and ca's are stored.

Do the same with the key that is framed with ca and /ca. Put it into a file my-ca.crt in ~/.cert/

Do the same with the private key (call it what-you-want.key). This is a static key instead of a human-readable password. You just select the right authentication method in your settings and reference the newly created file.

May I ask you why you are on F18? That release is not supported anymore, and I recommend you to upgrade to something more recent. F21 for example.

Good luck.

Correct, you can cut the keys from the .ovpn file and paste them into separate files, and then reference them in your connection settings.

Copy Cut the OpenVPN Static key V1 that is framed with tls-auth and /tls-auth to a new file with the ending .key into ~/.cert/ (i.e. my-ta-key.key).

~/.cert is a hidden directory in your home-dir where vpn keys and ca's are stored.

Do the same with the key that is framed with ca and /ca. Put it into a file my-ca.crt in ~/.cert/

Do the same with the private key (call it what-you-want.key). This is a static key instead of a human-readable password. You just select the right authentication method in your settings and reference the newly created file.

The remaining file (with out the keys) is your .ovpn config file.

May I ask you why you are on F18? That release is not supported anymore, and I recommend you to upgrade to something more recent. F21 for example.

Good luck.