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Okay, i am writing this becasue, other people can know what is happenning.

First, i deleted my swap partition, and what was happening is that fedora was waiting for the swap partition to appear, by default fedora has a timeout for this, you get the exact time everytime because its pre-defined.

To prevent this, you can edit the fstab file located in /etc, Now, what fstab does is tell fedora for what partitions are required to boot, SOLUTION: you can delete the line where it says swap in the end of the line, but its risky incase if someting happens, so we put a # infront of that line, # means "ignore it" the use of # is to tell the reader (you) something importent, so fedora ignores that stuff. Hope it helps (link for file example below)

------------------------------------------------STRAIGHT-FORWORD SOLUTION HERE-----------------------------------------

  1. Locate and open fstab file in /etc

  2. Locate the line where it says swap at the end of the line

  3. Put a # infront of that line

An example can be found here (Password:askfedora "no spaces here)

Okay, i am writing this becasue, other people can know what is happenning.

First, i deleted my swap partition, and what was happening is that fedora was waiting for the swap partition to appear, by default fedora has a timeout for this, you get the exact time everytime because its pre-defined.

To prevent this, you can edit the fstab file located in /etc, Now, what fstab does is tell fedora for what partitions are required to boot, SOLUTION: you can delete the line where it says swap in the end of the line, but its risky incase if someting happens, so we put a # infront of that line, # means "ignore it" the use of # is to tell the reader (you) something importent, so fedora ignores that stuff. Hope it helps (link for file example below)

------------------------------------------------STRAIGHT-FORWORD SOLUTION HERE-----------------------------------------HERE--------------------

  1. Locate and open fstab file in /etc

  2. Locate the line where it says swap at the end of the line

  3. Put a # infront of that line

An example can be found here (Password:askfedora "no spaces here)

here")

Okay, i am writing this becasue, because, other people can know what is happenning.happening.

First, i deleted my swap partition, and what was happening is that fedora was waiting for the swap partition to appear, by default fedora has a timeout for this, you get the exact time everytime because its pre-defined.predefined.

To prevent this, you can edit the fstab file located in /etc, Now, what fstab does is tell fedora for what partitions are required to boot, SOLUTION: you can delete the line where it says swap in the end of the line, but its risky incase if someting happens, so we put a # infront of that line, # means "ignore it" the use of # is to tell the reader (you) something importent, so fedora ignores that stuff. Hope it helps (link for file example below)

------------------------------------------------STRAIGHT-FORWORD --------------------STRAIGHT-FORWARD SOLUTION HERE--------------------

  1. Locate and open Open fstab file in /etc in a file editor with root privileges. sudo gedit /etc/fstab

  2. Locate the line where it says swap at the end of the line

  3. Put a # infront of that line

  4. Save the file

An example of the edited fstab file can be found here (Password:askfedora "no spaces here")

.

Okay, i am writing this because, other people can know what is happening.

First, i deleted my swap partition, and what was happening is that fedora was waiting for the swap partition to appear, by default fedora has a timeout for this, you get the exact time everytime because its predefined.

To prevent this, you can edit the fstab file located in /etc, Now, what fstab does is tell fedora for what partitions are required to boot, SOLUTION: you can delete the line where it says swap in the end of the line, but its risky incase if someting happens, so we put a # infront of that line, # means "ignore it" the use of # is to tell the reader (you) something importent, so fedora ignores that stuff. Hope it helps (link for file example below)

--------------------STRAIGHT-FORWARD SOLUTION HERE--------------------

  1. Open fstab file in /etc in a file editor with root privileges. sudo gedit /etc/fstab

  2. Locate the line where it says swap at the end of the line

  3. Put a # infront of that line

  4. Save the file

An example of the edited fstab file can be found here.