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No, it is not true that Fedora support all Windows applications. However, Wine does allow quite a few Windows applications to run on Linux. I have had very good luck with the PlayOnLinux front-end for Wine (see hhlp's answer).

If you have a or wish to buy a Windows license, virtualization is an option. However, it isn't really a solution because it still requires you to use Windows. VMware and Virtualbox work on Fedora. If you primarily need Windows applications, you may be better off just using it instead.

No, it is not true that Fedora support supports all Windows applications. However, Wine does allow quite a few Windows applications to run on Linux. I have had very good luck with the PlayOnLinux front-end for Wine (see hhlp's answer).

If you have a or wish to buy a Windows license, virtualization is an option. However, it isn't really a solution because it still requires you to use Windows. VMware and Virtualbox work on Fedora. If you primarily need Windows applications, you may be better off just using it instead.

No, it is not true that Fedora supports all Windows applications. However, Wine does allow quite a few Windows applications to run on Linux. I have had very good luck with the PlayOnLinux front-end for Wine (see hhlp's answer).

If you have a or wish to buy a Windows license, virtualization is an option. However, it isn't really a solution because it still requires you to use Windows. VMware and Virtualbox work on Fedora. If you primarily need Windows applications, you may be better off just using it instead.instead. Fedora could run in a virtual machine on Windows as well.

No, it is not true that Fedora supports all Windows applications. However, Wine does allow quite a few Windows applications to run on Linux. I have had very good luck with the PlayOnLinux front-end for Wine (see hhlp's answer).

If you have or wish to buy a Windows license, virtualization is an option. VMware and Virtualbox work on Fedora. However, it isn't really a solution because it still requires you to use Windows. VMware and Virtualbox work on Fedora. If you primarily need Windows applications, you may be better off just using it instead. Fedora could run in a virtual machine on Windows as well.