Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

click to hide/show revision 1
initial version

As I understand it, systemd is something different than syslog.

Systemd is a system and service manager for Linux, compatible with SysV and LSB init scripts. systemd provides aggressive parallelization capabilities, uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, offers on-demand starting of daemons, keeps track of processes using Linux control groups, supports snapshotting and restoring of the system state, maintains mount and automount points and implements an elaborate transactional dependency-based service control logic. It can work as a drop-in replacement for sysvinit.

Reference: http://freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd

As I understand it, systemd is something different than syslog.

Systemd is a system and service manager for Linux, compatible with SysV and LSB init scripts. systemd provides aggressive parallelization capabilities, uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, offers on-demand starting of daemons, keeps track of processes using Linux control groups, supports snapshotting and restoring of the system state, maintains mount and automount points and implements an elaborate transactional dependency-based service control logic. It can work as a drop-in replacement for sysvinit.

Reference: http://freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd

Syslog

Syslog is a standard for computer data logging. It separates the software that generates messages from the system that stores them and the software that reports and analyzes them.

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syslog