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Ok. I had a problem with this because I use an EFI system. First, is the grub2 menu showing updated version of Fedora? If not, it is probably because the command

sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

is putting the config in a different location than the bios is looking. For instance, the command I use to update grub2 is

grub2-efi-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2-efi/grub.cfg

This is where my SecureCoreTiano efi looks for the config files for booting. Do Not use my command. What I am suggesting is that you look in your boot folder. Look for grub.cfg files, and check the contents. Their is likely to be more than one of them. The one that does not have the ubuntu entries will be the one that your bios is looking at. the grub.cfg that does contain the ubuntu entries is where you keep writing it with the above command. All you need to do is change the command as I did to write to the proper location. Let me know what you come up with.

Ok. I had a problem with this because I use an EFI system. First, is the grub2 menu showing updated version of Fedora? If not, it is probably because the command

sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

is putting the config in a different location than the bios is looking. For instance, the command I use to update grub2 is

grub2-efi-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2-efi/grub.cfg

This is where my SecureCoreTiano efi looks for the config files for booting. Do Not use my command. What I am suggesting is that you look in your boot folder. Look for grub.cfg files, and check the contents. Their is likely to be more than one of them. The one that does not have the ubuntu entries will be the one that your bios is looking at. the at, and is not being updated with your command. The grub.cfg that does contain the ubuntu entries is where you keep writing it grub.cfg with the above command. All you need to do is change the command as I did to write to the proper location. Let me know what you come up with.