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No need to remove the /ustr/bin/sudo file.

You can use visudo to edit the file /etc/sudoers as follow:

As root, comment (#) the line

%wheel  ALL=(ALL)   ALL

and nobody will be able to use the sudo command, even if part of wheel group.

I would strongly advice to disable sudo access only after you have created a password for user root.

No need to remove the /ustr/bin/sudo file.

You can use visudo to edit the file /etc/sudoers as follow:

As root, comment (#) the line

%wheel  ALL=(ALL)   ALL

-->

# %wheel    ALL=(ALL)   ALL

and nobody will be able to use the sudo command, even if part of wheel group.

I would strongly advice to disable sudo access only after you have created a password for user root.

No need to remove the /ustr/bin/sudo file.file!

Suggestion 1: remove your user (or all users, or specific users) from the wheel group. Only users in that group can use the sudo command. Once removed, only root has superuser power.

Suggestion 2: You can use visudo to edit the file /etc/sudoers as follow:

As root, comment (#) the line

%wheel  ALL=(ALL)   ALL

-->

# %wheel    ALL=(ALL)   ALL

and nobody will be able to use the sudo command, even if part of wheel group.

I would strongly advice to disable sudo access only after you have created a password for user root.

No need to remove the /ustr/bin/sudo/usr/bin/sudo file!

Suggestion 1: remove your user (or all users, or specific users) from the wheel group. Only users in that group can use the sudo command. Once removed, only root has superuser power.

Suggestion 2: You can use visudo to edit the file /etc/sudoers as follow:

As root, comment (#) the line

%wheel  ALL=(ALL)   ALL

-->

# %wheel    ALL=(ALL)   ALL

and nobody will be able to use the sudo command, even if part of wheel group.

I would strongly advice to disable sudo access only after you have created a password for user root.