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If you just download the .rpm file and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available. I don't think there is a real repository from rpm-sphere.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

If you just download the .rpm file and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available. I don't think there is a real repository from rpm-sphere.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

EDIT:

So, this package would setup rpm-sphere as repo: https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html

if you then use dnf to install a package from there, it would get updated.

(I wouldn't trust it - but that's just a personal opinion).

If you just download the .rpm file and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available. I don't think there is a real repository from rpm-sphere.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

EDIT:

So, this package would setup rpm-sphere as repo: https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html

if you then use dnf to install a package from there, it would get updated.

(I wouldn't trust it - but that's just a personal opinion).

If you just download the .rpm file and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available. I don't think there is a real repository from rpm-sphere.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

EDIT:

So, this package would setup rpm-sphere as repo: https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html

if you then use dnf to install a package from there, it would get updated.

(I wouldn't trust it - but that's just a personal personal, uninformed opinion).

If you just download the .rpm file of a package and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available. I don't think there is a real repository from rpm-sphere.available.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

EDIT:

: So, this package would setup rpm-sphere as repo: https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html

https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html.

if you then use dnf to install a package from there, it would get updated.

updated.

(I wouldn't trust it - but that's just a personal, uninformed opinion).

If you just download the .rpm file of a package and install it using dnf it won't be updated (dnf can't know that there there may be a new version of that package out there).

If you add a third party software repository (for example: rpmfusion.org), then dnf will read the index of that repository and update packages as they become available.

Let's turn the question around, what package from rpm-sphere are you looking for?

Is it safe? Maybe. How authored the software? Have they been reviewed? Are the packages signed? One would need to know stuff like that before even guessing if they are may pose a risk.

EDIT: So, this package would setup rpm-sphere as repo: https://fedora.pkgs.org/28/rpm-sphere/rpmsphere-release-27-1.1.noarch.rpm.html. if you then use dnf to install a package from there, it would get updated. (I wouldn't trust it - but that's just a personal, uninformed opinion).

EDIT2:

there is a package ksensors, which is a KDE frontend to lm_sensors. You should give that a try!