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Your issue is not rare at all. Under certain circumstances, dnf doesn't know what packages are needed and when running dnf autoremove it removes essential packages and sometimes kills the installation.

Take a look at this search (or something similar), and you will see that this issue is absolutely not rare.

My advice:

  1. Never use Gnome Software to install or remove any packages (it doesn't share a transaction database with dnf and one doesn't know what the other is doing/did). Just it just or browsing available software.
  2. Never run dnf autoremove. If you still do so, check what packages it intends to remove before hitting 'Y')

Your issue is not rare at all. Under certain circumstances, dnf doesn't know what packages are needed and when running dnf autoremove it removes essential packages and sometimes kills the installation.

Take a look at this search (or something similar), and you will see that this issue is absolutely not rare. Redhat's bugtracker is documenting plenty of such cases, including stupid stuff like removing the booted kernel, the entire Desktop Environment, or even dnf itsself!

My advice: advice to prevent such disasters:

  1. Never use Gnome Software to install or remove any packages (it doesn't share a transaction database with dnf and one doesn't know what the other is doing/did). Just it just or Using two independent package managers causes most of the pain here. Max thing you should to with Gnome Software is is browsing for available software.
  2. Never run dnf autoremove. If you still do so, check what packages it intends to remove before hitting 'Y')

Your issue is not rare at all. Under certain circumstances, dnf doesn't know what packages are needed and when running dnf autoremove it removes essential packages and sometimes kills the installation.

Take a look at this search (or something similar), and you will see that this issue is absolutely not rare. Redhat's bugtracker is documenting plenty of such cases, including stupid stuff like removing the booted kernel, the entire Desktop Environment, or even dnf itsself!itself!

My advice to prevent such disasters:

  1. Never use Gnome Software to install or remove any packages (it doesn't share a transaction database with dnf and one doesn't know what the other is doing/did). Using two independent package managers causes most of the pain here. Max thing you should to with Gnome Software is is browsing for available software.
  2. Never run dnf autoremove. If you still do so, check what packages it intends to remove before hitting 'Y')

Your issue is not rare at all. Under certain circumstances, dnf doesn't know what packages are needed and when running dnf autoremove it removes essential packages and sometimes kills the installation.

Take a look at this search (or something similar), and you will see that this issue is absolutely not rare. Redhat's bugtracker is documenting plenty of such cases, including stupid stuff like removing the booted kernel, the entire Desktop Environment, or even dnf itself!

My advice to prevent such disasters:

  1. Never use Gnome Software to install or remove any packages (it doesn't share a transaction database with dnf and one doesn't know what the other is doing/did). Using two independent package managers causes most of the pain here. Max thing you should to with Gnome Software is browsing for available software.
  2. Never run dnf autoremove. If you still do so, check what packages it intends to remove before hitting 'Y')'Y'