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This is interesting, why does Fedora have both kernels as boot options?

Hi,

I recently upgraded my system by upgrading 1081 packages and I rebooted my system. I barely noticed it but I did, I noticed that there were three boot options for Fedora instead of two.

Fedora (4.14.3-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (4.14.9-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (0-rescue-blahblahblahblahblah) 27 (Workstation Edition)

I looked at it once again and thought ok the first two are almost the exact same. I had no idea what the "4.14.3-300" was or why they were different. I thought to myself "maybe that has something to do with what kernel versions I have installed". So i booted into one of them and ran the command uname -r and sure enough 4.13.9-300.fc27.x86_64 was the output. I tried booting with both of em and I am required to enter my encryption passphrase for both so I figure everythings okay. I knew that upgrading my system caused this. But the question is why didn't my system delete the old or "obsolete" kernel? It kept the old one. Thanks a lot!

This is interesting, why does Fedora have both kernels as boot options?

Hi,

I recently upgraded my system by upgrading 1081 packages and I rebooted my system. I barely noticed it but I did, I noticed that there were three boot options for Fedora instead of two.

Fedora (4.14.3-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (4.14.9-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (0-rescue-blahblahblahblahblah) 27 (Workstation Edition)

I looked at it once again and thought ok the first two are almost the exact same. I had no idea what the "4.14.3-300" was or why they were different. I thought to myself "maybe that has something to do with what kernel versions I have installed". So i booted into one of them and ran the command uname -r and sure enough 4.13.9-300.fc27.x86_64 was the output. I tried booting with both of em and I am required to enter my encryption passphrase for both so I figure everythings okay. I knew that upgrading my system caused this. But the question is why didn't my system delete the old or "obsolete" kernel? It kept the old one. Thanks a lot!

This is interesting, why does Fedora have both kernels as boot options?

Hi,

I recently upgraded my system by upgrading and I rebooted my system. I barely noticed it but I did, I noticed that there were three boot options for Fedora instead of two.

Fedora (4.14.3-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (4.14.9-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (0-rescue-blahblahblahblahblah) 27 (Workstation Edition)

I looked at it once again and thought ok the first two are almost the exact same. I had no idea what the "4.14.3-300" was or why they were different. I thought to myself "maybe that has something to do with what kernel versions I have installed". versions". So i booted into one of them and ran the command uname -r and sure enough 4.13.9-300.fc27.x86_64 was the output. I tried booting with both of em and I am required to enter my encryption passphrase for both so I figure everythings okay. I knew that upgrading my system caused this. But the question is why didn't my system delete the old or "obsolete" kernel? It kept the old one. Thanks a lot!

This is interesting, why does Fedora have both kernels as boot options?

Hi,

I recently upgraded my system by upgrading and I rebooted my system. I barely noticed it but I did, I noticed that there were three boot options for Fedora instead of two.

Fedora (4.14.3-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (4.14.9-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (0-rescue-blahblahblahblahblah) 27 (Workstation Edition)

I looked at it once again and thought ok the first two are almost the exact same. I had no idea what the "4.14.3-300" was or why they were different. I thought to myself "maybe that has something to do with what the kernel versions". So i booted into one of them and ran the command uname -r and sure enough 4.13.9-300.fc27.x86_64 was the output. I tried booting with both of em and I am required to enter my encryption passphrase for both so I figure everythings okay. I knew that upgrading my system caused this. But the question is why didn't my system delete the old or "obsolete" kernel? It kept the old one. Thanks a lot!

This is interesting, why does Fedora have both kernels as boot options?

Hi,

I recently upgraded my system by upgrading and I and rebooted my system. I barely noticed it but I did, I noticed that there were three boot options for Fedora instead of two.

Fedora (4.14.3-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (4.14.9-300.fc27.x86_64) 27 (Workstation Edition)
Fedora (0-rescue-blahblahblahblahblah) 27 (Workstation Edition)

I looked at it once again and thought ok the first two are almost the exact same. I had no idea what the "4.14.3-300" was or why they were different. I thought to myself "maybe that has something to do with the kernel versions". linux kernel". So i booted into one of them and ran the command uname -r and sure enough 4.13.9-300.fc27.x86_64 was the output. I tried booting with both of em and I am required to enter my encryption passphrase for both so I figure everythings okay. I knew that upgrading my system caused this. But the question is why didn't my system delete the old or "obsolete" kernel? It kept the old one. Thanks a lot!