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How many ways are there to configure an interface?

asked 2016-03-10 19:13:08 -0600

j.westerdale gravatar image

Hi all,

How many ways are currently in place to manage network configurations?

At one point, it was the scripts in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts. Add in some /etc/udev magic and we had a real solid solution.

Then there is Network-Manager and its nmcli pal.

Now there is a network config and device control under systemd.

Whats the best practice for network configuration (Static, static DHCP, Dynamic, Wlan, etc) for usage on Fedora? Then for DHCP options,there are so many!

Is there some way to pick one way or another?

Thanks!

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answered 2016-03-11 03:26:30 -0600

Hi: Basically there are two ways, the correct one and the incorrect one :) If you have NetworkManager enabled (default) use the NM tools (either cli or UI) to manage them. Just try to avoid mixing different techniques.

Regards

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NetworkManager is not the only correct choice, there are user cases where MN will not work, although libvirt and NM are getting better, NM does not manage bridges for example.

bodhi.zazen gravatar imagebodhi.zazen ( 2016-03-11 12:19:59 -0600 )edit
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answered 2016-03-11 12:16:34 -0600

updated 2016-03-11 12:18:23 -0600

There are several methods.

The easiest, and default is to use NetworkManager, either graphically or the command line, nmcli.

From your question, it appears you are trying to manually configure your network. In the event NM can not configure your network or if you so desire you can manually edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts . In that case you will want to disable network manager and enable network

You can also use networkd http://xmodulo.com/switch-from-networ...

https://major.io/2015/03/26/creating-...

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/...

Really, there is no single method that works for everyone, it depends on what you need. In general, if NetworkManager works, use it. Otherwise, with modern systems, I suggest networkd if you need something NM will not do for you, bridge for example.

A better question is, what are you trying to do, and why are you manually edting those system files ?

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Asked: 2016-03-10 19:13:08 -0600

Seen: 80 times

Last updated: Mar 11 '16