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Why does DNF propose i686 wine packages on a 64-bit computer ?

asked 2017-05-21 05:08:35 -0600

matpy gravatar image

Hello,

I've installed Fedora on my 64-bit computer one year ago. I recently upgraded it to the last release so everything was good.

During the last dnf update I did, there was a a lot of transaction errors because of i686 Wine packages. I supressed them from the update list. Since this update, Wine is no longer working. Each time I try to reinstall it, DNF well propose wine.x86_64 but all the dependencies are i686 packages. I don't remember Wine working like this.

I've counted 8442 i686 packages for 20220 x86_64 packages on my system. I know it's normal to have some 32-bit programs which don't work with 64-bit but this ratio seems to me too much big.

Does this problem come from an error in DNF configuration ?

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what fedora version you had before? how did you install wine?

jlozadad gravatar imagejlozadad ( 2017-05-21 08:30:29 -0600 )edit

I upgraded from Fedora 24 to 25 on January and I installed Wine with DNF when I was on Fedora 24. I also use PlayOnLinux which installed some old versions but I never had any issue with it.

matpy gravatar imagematpy ( 2017-05-21 11:16:24 -0600 )edit

I do not recommend installing wine, for nothing in the world!!

davidva gravatar imagedavidva ( 2017-05-23 01:42:57 -0600 )edit

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answered 2017-06-02 12:51:38 -0600

villykruse gravatar image

wine.x8664 is a package without files, but depends on other wine pacakges, both 32 bit and 64 bit. You may chose to remove wine.x8664, and this allows you to remove the other 32bit wine packages as well. If this is a working configuration, I don't know, so proceed at your own risk.

Of course, without the 32 bit wine packages you can only run 64 bit windows programs.

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Asked: 2017-05-21 05:08:35 -0600

Seen: 434 times

Last updated: Jun 02 '17