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If you can access a Windows machine (either through dual-booting, a friend or a second PC) download and run a tool called Recuva by Piriform. It will scan your drive for deleted files, and allow you to easily recover them. If you don't have access to a Windows machine, you can use Test Disk (as you said) or you can use PhotoRec (it recovers more than photos). I will caution you to not write any data to the USB until you have taken care of the problem, but this may not be necessary. You said that you haven't written anything else to it. Deleting data and formatting drives is a common practice when setting up bootable drives. The media writer was meant to warn you about this, but if it did, I expect the Fedora devs to sympathise with you, but tell you the same that I did. This isn't something that will change.

If you can access a Windows machine (either through dual-booting, a friend or a second PC) download and run a tool called Recuva by Piriform. It will scan your drive for deleted files, and allow you to easily recover them. If you don't have access to a Windows machine, you can use Test Disk (as you said) or you can use PhotoRec (it recovers more than photos). photos).

I will caution you to not write any data to the USB until you have taken care of the problem, but this may not be necessary. You said that you haven't written anything else to it. it.

Deleting data and formatting drives is a common practice when setting up bootable drives. The media writer was meant to warn you about this, but if it did, I expect the Fedora devs to sympathise with you, but tell you the same that I did. This isn't something that will change.