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You want GRUB (the Linux bootloader) to be loaded by your BIOS. It can then load Windows, Fedora or any other OS for you. The reason for this is that it supports many operating systems better than Microsoft's bootloader. You need to add Windows to GRUB. There are a number of ways to do this. A simple solution is running the command "update-grub" which will force GRUB to search your hard drive(s) for operating systems, and add them to its list. You can try the Boot Repair tool, but it is unfortunately not available as an application on Fedora (Fedora doesn't support user-managed [ppa] repos). It is fortunately available as a live CD as well, available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/files/. It should fix everything without issue, but if it fails you can get detailed instructions and photos at http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/. If you would like to do this by editing grub.cfg, detailed instructions can be found here, but it may be too difficult for you. I'd recommend backing up grub.cfg (found at /boot/grub/grub.cfg, if I'm not mistaken) and having a live CD on hand to fix up any possible issues. If one does occur, boot up the live CD and replace grub.cfg with your backup.

You want GRUB (the Linux bootloader) to be loaded by your BIOS. It can then load Windows, Fedora or any other OS for you. The reason for this is that it supports many operating systems better than Microsoft's bootloader. bootloader.

You need to add Windows to GRUB. There are a number of ways to do this. A simple solution is running the command "update-grub" which will force GRUB to search your hard drive(s) for operating systems, and add them to its list. You can try the Boot Repair tool, but it is unfortunately not available as an application on Fedora (Fedora doesn't support user-managed [ppa] repos). It is fortunately available as a live CD as well, available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/files/. It should fix everything without issue, but if it fails you can get detailed instructions and photos at http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/. If you would like to do this by editing grub.cfg, detailed instructions can be found here, but it may be too difficult for you. you.

I'd recommend backing up grub.cfg (found at /boot/grub/grub.cfg, if I'm not mistaken) and having a live CD on hand to fix up any possible issues. If one does occur, boot up the live CD and replace grub.cfg with your backup.