Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

Step 1 - At the grub boot menu, press 'e' to edit the bootup settings.

Step 2 - go down to the line starting with "linux16 /vmlinuz" (it will probably span multiple lines) and add a " 3" to the end (that is a space, then a '3'). This will tell the bootup scripts to load only the text console, and not attempt to start a graphical login screen.

Step 3 - Press CTRL-X to bootup.

Step 4 - login as root.

Step 5 - "vi /etc/gdm/custom.conf" (or use your editor preference instead of vi, and delete the leading "#" from the line "#WaylandEnable=false". Save the file.

Step 6 - Reboot and enjoy :)

Note that I have heard the replacing step 5 with "dnf update" will also fix the issue (and update the rest of the system in the process). This would be preferable to just updating the file as per the above, but you can always follow my instructions and then run an update once you are able to graphically login.

Note 2 that if you edit custom.conf from the host (using kpartx to access the filesystem as per my comment to the original post) then you will break the selinux permissions and you will end up with the same symptoms (bootup stalls with fedora logo). If you have done this, then you can use my instructions (Steps 1 through 4 above) to boot into text mode and fix the permissions by running "restorecon -R -v /etc". It should then bootup properly.

Step 1 - At the grub boot menu, press 'e' to edit the bootup settings.

Step 2 - go down to the line starting with "linux16 /vmlinuz" (it will probably span multiple lines) and add a " 3" to the end (that is a space, then a '3'). This will tell the bootup scripts to load only the text console, and not attempt to start a graphical login screen.

Step 3 - Press CTRL-X to bootup.

Step 4 - login as root.

Step 5 - "vi /etc/gdm/custom.conf" (or use your editor preference instead of vi, and delete the leading "#" from the line "#WaylandEnable=false". Save the file.

Step 6 - Reboot and enjoy :)

Note that I have heard the that replacing step 5 with "dnf update" will also fix the issue (and update the rest of the system in the process). This would be preferable to just updating the file as per the above, but you can always follow my instructions and then run an update once you are able to graphically login.

Note 2 that if you edit custom.conf from the host (using kpartx to access the filesystem as per my comment to the original post) then you will break the selinux permissions and you will end up with the same symptoms (bootup stalls with fedora logo). If you have done this, then you can use my instructions (Steps 1 through 4 above) to boot into text mode and fix the permissions by running "restorecon -R -v /etc". It should then bootup properly.

Step 1 - At the grub boot menu, press 'e' to edit the bootup settings.

Step 2 - go down to the line starting with "linux16 /vmlinuz" (it will probably span multiple lines) and add a " 3" to the end (that is a space, then a '3'). This will tell the bootup scripts to load only the text console, and not attempt to start a graphical login screen.

Step 3 - Press CTRL-X to bootup.

Step 4 - login as root.

Step 5 - "vi /etc/gdm/custom.conf" (or use your editor preference instead of vi, vi), and delete the leading "#" from the line "#WaylandEnable=false". Save the file.

Step 6 - Reboot and enjoy :)

Note that I have heard that replacing step 5 with "dnf update" will also fix the issue (and update the rest of the system in the process). This would be preferable to just updating the file as per the above, but you can always follow my instructions and then run an update once you are able to graphically login.

Note 2 that if you edit custom.conf from the host (using kpartx to access the filesystem as per my comment to the original post) then you will break the selinux permissions and you will end up with the same symptoms (bootup stalls with fedora logo). If you have done this, then you can use my instructions (Steps 1 through 4 above) to boot into text mode and fix the permissions by running "restorecon -R -v /etc". It should then bootup properly.