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Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch to the disk to GPT.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch to the disk to GPT.GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many extended partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3, /dev/sda4, and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch to the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many extended partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3, /dev/sda4, and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch to the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many extended partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

I assumed your /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 have Windows installed on them.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch to the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many extended partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

I assumed your /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 have Windows installed on them.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many extended logical partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

I assumed your /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 have Windows installed on them.

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many logical partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

I assumed your /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 have Windows installed on them.

EDIT:

Your output of fdisk -l shows that /dev/sda6 is a FAT16 filesystem not an EXT4 as you said. Try formatting the partition before installing Fedora on it.

I had the same problem some time ago. Fedora tries to group the /, /home, and swap partitions on an extended partition and creates a separate primary partition for /boot. It might not install because you already have 3 primary partitions. It did not install for me. I had to switch the disk to GPT. Or you could erase the extended partition, install Fedora using all available space, and create as many logical partitions as you need inside the Fedora extended partition. Then copy your files in the original /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda5 to the new partitions.

I assumed your /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 have Windows installed on them.

EDIT:

EDIT:

Easiest way is just like "hedayat" suggested: Remove /dev/sda6 and let Fedora do the automatic partitioning on the newly unallocated space.