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That’s by design. Gnome in Fedora 28 Now uses some Mac OS X type of right click.

See :

That’s by design. Gnome in Fedora 28 Now now uses some Mac OS X type of right click, called clickfinger. Place a second finger on the touchpad and you’ll get back your right click.

See :: https://who-t.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/gnome-328-uses-clickfinger-behaviour-by.html

That’s by design. Gnome in Fedora 28 now uses some Mac OS X type of right click, called clickfinger. Place a second finger on the touchpad and you’ll get back your right click.

See : https://who-t.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/gnome-328-uses-clickfinger-behaviour-by.html

and https://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/clickpad_softbuttons.html

That’s by design. Gnome in Fedora 28 now uses some Mac OS X type of right click, called clickfinger. Place a second finger on the touchpad and you’ll get back your right click.

See : https://who-t.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/gnome-328-uses-clickfinger-behaviour-by.html

and https://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/clickpad_softbuttons.html

Actually, Gnome 3.28 Release Notes also mention this new feature.

gnome-tweak-tool allows you to change the mouse and touchpad behaviour...

That’s by design. Gnome in Fedora 28 now uses some Mac OS X type of right click, called clickfinger. Place a second finger on the touchpad and you’ll get back your right click.

See : https://who-t.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/gnome-328-uses-clickfinger-behaviour-by.html

https://who-t.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/gnome-328-uses-clickfinger-behaviour-by.html and https://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/clickpad_softbuttons.html

Actually, Gnome 3.28 Release Notes also mention this new feature.

gnome-tweak-tool allows you to change the mouse and touchpad behaviour...