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Not sure what kind of problems your are having (you don't specify), but switching to a 64 bit kernel is possible. You will have to do a new install of the kernel. Now, whether you can keep your data depends on your file system setup. I can see 2 possibilities:

  1. Your data is part of the same file system / partition as your system software (kernel).
  2. Your data is on a separate file system / partition.

In case 1 you will have to backup your data and install the system. It might be an idea to create a separate mount point for your data. I usually tend to create a different partition or disk for my /home directory which I then mount. So it should be part of your /etc/fstab.

In case 2 you already have your system software and your data separate, so you could just install the new kernel on the system partition. Don't forget to save your configuration files if they are different from default and restore them after installation. Take care to check whether the configuration files had a change that is relevant to your setup. A backup of your data files is never a bad idea, even your setup is to separate data and system.

Hope this helps you.

P.S. If your problems turn out to be hardware related, switching to 64 bits might not help.

Not sure what kind of problems your you are are having (you don't specify), but switching to a 64 bit kernel is possible. You will have to do a new install of the kernel. Now, whether you can keep your data depends on your file system setup. I can see 2 possibilities:

  1. Your data is part of the same file system / partition as your system software (kernel).
  2. Your data is on a separate file system / partition.

In case 1 you will have to backup your data and install the system. It might be an idea to create a separate mount point for your data. I usually tend to create a different partition or disk for my /home directory which I then mount. So it should be part of your /etc/fstab.

In case 2 you already have your system software and your data separate, so you could just install the new kernel on the system partition. Don't forget to save your configuration files if they are different from default and restore them after installation. Take care to check whether the configuration files had a change that is relevant to your setup. A backup of your data files is never a bad idea, even your setup is to separate data and system.

Hope this helps you.

P.S. If your problems turn out to be hardware related, switching to 64 bits might not help.

Not sure what kind of problems you are are having (you don't specify), but switching to a 64 bit kernel is possible. You will have to do a new install of the kernel. Now, whether you can keep your data depends on your file system setup. I can see 2 possibilities:

  1. Your data is part of the same file system / partition as your system software (kernel).
  2. Your data is on a separate file system / partition.

In case 1 you will have to backup your data and install the system. It might be an idea to create a separate mount point for your data. I usually tend to create a different partition or disk for my /home directory which I then mount. So it should be part of your /etc/fstab.

In case 2 you already have your system software and your data separate, so you could just install the new kernel on the system partition. Don't forget to save your configuration files if they are different from default and restore them after installation. Take care to check whether the configuration files had a change that is relevant to your setup. A backup of your data files is never a bad idea, even if your setup is to separate data and system.

Hope this helps you.

P.S. If your problems turn out to be hardware related, switching to 64 bits might not help.

Not sure what kind of problems you are are having (you don't specify), but switching to a 64 bit kernel is possible. You will have to do a new install of the kernel. As you have to do a new install, you cannot keep your currently installed programs, but you can install them after installing the new kernel. If you have 32-bit programs that need to stay 32 bit (usually wine etc) they should also work on the 64 bit kernel. Now, whether you can keep your data depends on your file system setup. I can see 2 possibilities:

  1. Your data is part of the same file system / partition as your system software (kernel).
  2. Your data is on a separate file system / partition.

In case 1 you will have to backup your data and install the system. It might be an idea to create a separate mount point for your data. I usually tend to create a different partition or disk for my /home directory which I then mount. So it should be part of your /etc/fstab.

In case 2 you already have your system software and your data separate, so you could just install the new kernel on the system partition. Don't forget to save your configuration files if they are different from default and restore them after installation. Take care to check whether the configuration files had a change that is relevant to your setup. A backup of your data files is never a bad idea, even if your setup is to separate data and system.

Hope this helps you.

P.S. If your problems turn out to be hardware related, switching to 64 bits might not help.