Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

click to hide/show revision 1
initial version

This is what the manual says about the priority configuration: (http://dnf.readthedocs.io/en/latest/conf_ref.html)

The priority value of this repository, default is 99. If there is more than one candidate package for a particular operation, the one from a repo with the lowest priority value is picked, possibly despite being less convenient otherwise (e.g. by being a lower version).

Reading that, I think this is different from what you had thought. It means that priority only comes to play when there is a package available from several repositories - then dnf selects the repo with the lowest priority.

What you want is to prioritize a certain repo (i.e. fedora-updates) over another one (i.e. rpmfusion-nonfree-updates). I don't see why you would want to do that. Once dnf runs an update, it will just update all packages available for update. If one repo is unavailable it will skip the broken repo. Is your concern out of limited bandwidth?

This is what the manual says about the priority configuration: (http://dnf.readthedocs.io/en/latest/conf_ref.html)

The priority value of this repository, default is 99. If there is more than one candidate package for a particular operation, the one from a repo with the lowest priority value is picked, possibly despite being less convenient otherwise (e.g. by being a lower version).

Reading that, I think this is different from what you had thought. It means that priority only comes to play when there is a package available from several repositories - then dnf selects the repo with the lowest priority.

What you want are trying is to prioritize a certain repo (i.e. fedora-updates) over another one (i.e. rpmfusion-nonfree-updates). I don't see why you would want to do that. Once dnf runs an update, it will just update all packages available for update. If one repo is unavailable it will skip the broken repo. Is your concern out of limited bandwidth?

Also note, security patches are not only provided by Fedora's standard repos. If there is a security-related issue with one of the packages installed from a third-party repo, you receive the update from there. So, in that case, you may not want to have lower priority for 3rd party.

If you ask me, leave everything as is.